January 7, 2012

Franklin County Motorcycle Accident on Route HH near Rock Church Road

Two Missourians were injured in a Franklin County Missouri personal injury accident on January 7, 2012 at 12:56pm. The afternoon accident occurred on Route HH near Rock Church Road.

The accident occurred as Keith L. McGee, 40, of Ballwin, Missouri drove on southbound Route HH. The 2009 Kawasaki VR100 driven by McGee crossed the centerline of the roadway. The motorcycle crashed into a 2006 Dodge Dakota, driven by Walter F. Lee of High Ridge, Missouri.

Two Missourians sustained moderate injuries in the accident: Delores E. Utley of Osage Beach, Missouri and McGee. Utley, 72, was a passenger in the Dodge. Utley was transported to St. Claire Hospital by Meramec Ambulance. McGee was taken to Mercy in Creve Coeur. Both injured parties were transported by Meramec Ambulance.

Higher gas prices have encouraged many commuters to drive motorcycles. Motorcycle fuel economy tends to be much better than car or SUV fuel economy. Some motorcycles have been documented as getting hundreds of miles per gallon (mpg). However, owning and operating a motorcycle requires prudence.

Motorcycles require careful maintenance. Motorcycle owners should exercise care in choosing a mechanic. Motorcycles should only select mechanics who are competent. Motorcycle owners may be able to read reviews of various mechanics and motorcycle repair shops in making their decision. Negligent motorcycle repair can cause Missouri motorcycle accidents. Negligent motorcycle mechanics may fail to notice that the tires are improperly aligned or that the engine has problems that could lead to a failure. These mistakes may lead to a serious accident.

Motorcycle accidents may also be caused by the driver of a passenger vehicle. Car drivers may fail to notice that the motorcycle is driving on the roadway and crash into it. Car drivers should exercise due care to ensure that a motorcycle is not in their blind spot. Failure to exercise that care constitutes negligence.

October 6, 2011

Jackson County Missouri Motorcycle Accident Kills Blue Springs Man

Andrew D. Hart of Blue Springs, Missouri lost his life in a Jackson County Missouri motorcycle accident. The fatal Jackson County Missouri motorcycle accident occurred on October 2, 2011 at 1:24pm.

The accident began as David C. Ponder of Springfield, Missouri was stopped in a 1993 Nissan for unknown reasons in the center lane of eastbound I-470 at View High Drive. Hart attempted to avoid the stopped car in his 2003 Harley Davidson motorcycle. Despite his attempts, the motorcycle struck the stopped car. The impact caused the car to overturn and travel off the roadway. Hart was ejected from his motorcycle.

Hart passed away in the Jackson County Missouri motorcycle accident. Ponder was moderately injured. He was transported to Research Medical Center by Lees Summit Fire Department. The parties were assisted by the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the Missouri Department of Transportation, the Lee’s Summit Police Department, and the Kansas City Police Department. According to reports, charges are pending.

The number of deaths caused by Missouri motorcycle accidents has been steadily increasing. According to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more than 4,000 motorcyclists died in traffic accidents in 2009 alone. Data shows that traffic accidents killed fewer than 3,000 people each year from 1994-2000.

The risk of ejection from a motorcycle is high during a Missouri traffic accident. Unlike passenger cars, motorcycles are not equipped with seat belts to prevent ejection. Since motorcycles may be ejected during a collision, motorcyclists are advised to wear personal protective equipment, including helmets, gloves, and jackets.

Helmets are designed to protect the head during a collision. Full-face helmet is the best choice for motorcyclists. Gloves increase the amount of control that a motorcyclist maintains. Gloves may provide protection for the fingers and wrists. Jackets may be equipped with airbags. Jackets may cover back and chest protectors. Protective equipment may have plastic segments that enable motorcyclists to slide on the roadway after an ejection. Sliding on the roadway instead of slamming into the roadway may decrease the risk of injury.

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September 26, 2011

Lathrop Woman Seriously Injured by Deer-Related Motorcycle Crash

A Lathrop, Missouri motorcyclist was seriously injured in a Missouri deer traffic accident on September 26, 2011 at 5:50pm. Shana M. Hopkins, 39, of Lathrop drove her 2004 Harley Davidson motorcycle on U.S. Highway 36 – 0.5 miles of west of Utica. As she drove, a deer crossed the roadway from right to left. Hopkins struck the deer. The motorcycle crashed on the centerline on its side and stopped in the passing lane. Hopkins was ejected from the motorcycle.

Drivers and motorcyclists need to be aware of the dangers posed by wild deer and other animals. More than 3,500 people were involved in Missouri deer traffic accidents in 2007. According to reports, autumn may be the most dangerous season for deer-related traffic accident.

The risk for Missouri deer car accidents may be increasing in Missouri’s urban areas. According to local deer expert, the number of deer in Missouri’s urban areas is increasing. Experts indicate that there is a particular risk for Boone County Missouri deer car accidents because of an increased deer population.

Drivers should take care to drive prudently to avoid Missouri deer traffic accidents. Motorists may want to swerve to avoid striking a deer, but experts say that swerving is not advised. Swerving near a deer actually increases the risk of serious injury and death. As always, motorists are recommended to wear seat belts whenever possible. Motorcyclists do not have the option of wearing a seat belt, so protective clothes and headgear are recommended.

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August 1, 2011

Doniphan Residents Injured in Double Missouri Motorcycle Accident

Two Doniphan residents were taken to Poplar Bluff Regional Medical Center after they were involved in a double motorcycle accident on August 1, 2011. The Ripley County Missouri motorcycle accident occurred on US-160, at Ballpark Road.

Robert M. Patrick, 39, drove a 1991 Harley Davidson on US-160. The Missouri motorcycle accident occurred when Patrick crashed into a 2005 Harley Davidson driven by John R. Brouk, 51. The motorcycles came to rest on the roadway.

Brouk was moderately injured in the accident. Dawn L. Jackson, the 36 year old occupant on Brouk’s motorcycle, was seriously injured. They were both transported to the hospital by EMS for medical treatment. There were no reported injuries for Patrick. All parties involved were from Doniphan, Missouri.

Missouri motorcycle accidents can be especially injurious. Motorcycles cannot provide the structural safety features that passenger cars can provide. Passenger cars are equipped with crumple zones to absorb the forces of a collision. The crumple zones of the car are crushed by the forces of the accident so that the people inside the car may be spared. Motorcycles cannot provide the same protection. Motorcyclist accident victims are more exposed to the strong, damaging forces of a collision. As a result, motorcyclists are more likely to suffer serious injury or death.

Traffic studies show that motorcycle riders are twenty-one times more likely to die in an accident than occupants of other types of vehicles. Motorcycle crashes are four times more likely to result in injury. Moreover, not all injuries are immediately apparent. Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are often the result of Missouri motorcycle accidents, but TBIs often have delayed symptoms. A motorcycle accident victim may feel comfortable after the accident, only to discover symptoms hours or days later. Motorcycle accident victims should always accept medical treatment and call a Missouri motorcycle accident lawyer after a collision.

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May 4, 2011

Franklin County Three Vehicle Accident Seriously Injures Motorcyclist

A motorcycle driver was seriously injured in a Franklin County Missouri motorcycle accident on May 3, 2011 at 3:09pm. The Missouri motorcycle accident occurred on Highway A near Julie Lane. Clestin J. Hohlt from Union, Missouri was stopped in traffic in a 2003 Jeep Cherokee. Harold V. Huston of Wildwood, Missouri was stopped behind Hohlt’s Jeep in a 2011 Harley Davidson MC.

William M. Mueller from Washington, Missouri caused the Missouri motorcycle accident when he crashed into the back of Hutson’s Harley Davidson with a 1988 Ford F150. The crash pushed the motorcycle off the roadway. The motorcycle overturned, ejecting Hustson. Mueller’s F150 continued and crashed into Hohlt’s Jeep, causing a Missouri rear impact car accident. Huston’s Harley Davidson sustained moderate damage, along with the Jeep Cherokee. The F150 was totaled.

Hutson was seriously injured in the accident. He was transported by Air Evac to St. John’s in Creve Coeur, Missouri. Missouri motorcycle accident injuries are often serious because motorcycles lack the structural protection of other vehicles. As a result, motorcycle riders often suffer serious injuries or death in multivehicle accidents. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, motorcycle riders sustain 98% of fatalities in accidents involving motorcycles and passenger vehicles. Thousands of motorcycle riders die in motorcycle accidents each year.

Given the potential for serious injuries and death in Missouri motorcycle crashes, motorcycle riders should observe a number of riding safety tips. Motorcycle riders should take care to be seen by other drivers. Keep the motorcycle’s headlamps on, even during the day, to increase visibility. Wear bright clothing while riding. Position the motorcycle so other drivers can see it – avoid blind spots and the area behind large vehicles. To avoid injury in the event of an accident, wear a motorcycle helmet.

Wearing an appropriate motorcycle helmet may decrease the likelihood of dangerous motorcycle accident injuries. Protective headgear for motorcycle riders is required on interstate highways in Missouri. Protective headgear must be “reasonable” according to the specifications mandated by Missouri’s state government. Wearing a helmet is not required for a motorcycle rider over the age of 21 who is not on an interstate highway. Nevertheless, wearing a helmet whenever riding a motorcycle is recommended to prevent serious injuries and fatalities.

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April 11, 2011

Osceola Missouri Motorcyclist Killed in Hit-and-Run Accident

An Osceola, Missouri man died in a fatal Missouri motorcycle accident on April 10, 2011 at 5:14pm in Henry County, Missouri.

Terrence Y. Cashell, 49, drove a 2002 Harley Davidson on MO-13 in Henry County, Missouri on Sunday evening. Cashell was driving at the intersection of MO-13 and Northeast 400 Road when an unknown driver struck Cashell’s motorcycle with a 2001 Chevrolet. Cashell was ejected from the Harley Davidson in the Missouri motorcycle accident.

The unknown driver continued to drive after striking Cashell and left the scene of the accident. Cashell was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident by Henry County Coroner Dain Sisk. The Missouri motorcycle crash totaled the Harley Davidson.

Motorcycles are generally more dangerous than automobiles and trucks. If a motorcyclist is hit in a Missouri auto accident, the motorcycle provides little to no protection from the force of the collision. Extensive injuries may result from even low-speed motorcycle accidents. A collision that would be minor with an automobile becomes deadly with a motorcycle.

Missouri has enacted motorcycle safety laws to decrease motorcycle accident fatalities and Missouri motorcycle accident injuries. For example, motorcycle accidents may result in traumatic brain injury. In response to this risk, Missouri statute §302.020 requires that motorcycle drivers and passengers wear a helmet while operating on any highway in Missouri. The state government establishes guidelines and specifications for protective headgear that motorcyclists should wear. Anyone who violates §302.020 by operating or riding on a motorcycle without an appropriate helmet is guilty of a class A misdemeanor. Three or more violations result in a class D felony.

Missouri statute §577.060 prohibits leaving the scene of a Missouri motorcycle crash. Leaving the scene of the accident is typically a class A misdemeanor. However, if the accident results in physical injury to another party, the violation becomes a felony. When the accident causes a death, a serious investigation may follow.

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October 30, 2010

Tar on roadway can become hazard for motorcyclists

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A common sight on Missouri roadways, the black tar lines that criss-cross the street in many locations don't seem to pose much of a threat. This is true for the average motorist driving a car, but for motorcyclists it's a different story. Those lines, sometimes called "black tar snakes", can be incredibly dangerous to two-wheeled vehicles and have lead to a number of deadly motorcycle accidents.

The cause for concern stems from the fact that those tar lines can become very slick, especially in wet or hot conditions. Cars have four points of contact with the road so even if one tire loses traction on a tar line, the others will keep the car stable. Motorcycles and their two wheels are much more susceptible to losing control when hitting a slick spot.

Road crews use the tar to fill in cracks on the roadway. This is very common here in Missouri where winter temperatures cause wear and tear resulting in more cracks in the pavement. Rather than replace sections of roadway every year, the cracks are sealed with tar.

The way the tar is applied has an effect on how dangerous it can be. If excess amounts of tar are not scraped away, the slick area is larger and more likely to cause a Missouri motorcycle crash. Also, the tar is actually a mixture with different sealants and if this mixture is not made well, it can also make for a slicker finished product.

There are no numbers to show just how many wrecks are caused by the tar lines because it is not tracked by any national agency. Even in cases where the tar lines may have had an effect, the accident reports can be inconclusive. Motorcyclists who have been riding for years, though, will likely be very aware of these hazards. New riders need to be aware of these lines and the problems they cause, particularly if you hit them while accelerating or braking.

October 17, 2010

Missouri man killed after motorcycle accident

Larry Winch, 59, was killed in a St. Francois County motorcycle accident when he collided with a car on Route D Sunday afternoon.

Winch was riding his 1999 Yamaha XVS1100 southbound on Route D at the time of the wreck, according to the Missouri State Highway Patrol. At the same time, Cynthia Streiler, 51, was driving a 1995 Subaru Impreza northbound on Route D. As both vehicles approached the intersection with Route O, Streiler attempted to make a left turn. She failed to yield to the oncoming motorcyclist and pulled directly into Winch's path.

Winch was unable to avoid a collision and hit the side of Streiler's vehicle. The force of the impact threw him from his bike and totaled both vehicles.

Winch was pronounced dead on the scene. Despite the extensive damage to her vehicle, Streiler was uninjured in this Missouri motorcycle crash, according to the initial crash report.

Our thoughts are with the families of the two involved in this terrible incident.

One of the most common causes of motorcycle accidents is other drivers not seeing the smaller motorcyclist and pulling into their path or merging into their lane. Motorcycles, because of their size, are more easily concealed in blind spots and behind other vehicles.

Another problem is a sort of optical illusion that is produced when looking at a motorcycle as compared to a car. When viewing an oncoming motorcycle, the narrower frame and single headlight plays tricks on our depth perception, especially when we are used to only looking at cars, and may make it harder to perceive the vehicle's speed.

Drivers have the responsibility to know what other vehicles are on the road around them, big or small, and use excessive caution when navigating around motorcycles.

October 5, 2010

Motorcyclist injures pedestrians after losing control performing trick

Three people were hospitalized, including two pedestrians, after a St. Charles County motorcycle accident on Highway 94.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, John Gall, 36, was traveling southbound on the highway on his 2006 Kawasaki Motorcycle when he attempted to perform a wheelie just north of Firehouse Drive. Gall lost control of his bike and it slid off the right side of the roadway. The motorcycle hit three pedestrians and a utility pole before coming to rest on the side of the road.

Two of the pedestrians, Mark Jesse, 53, and Kelly Roth, 44, sustained significant injuries and were taken to a local hospital for treatment. The third pedestrian was not listed as having serious injuries on the accident report.

Gall also sustained serious injury and was taken by ambulance for emergency treatment.

While the laws vary from state to state, and each municipality enforces motorcycle laws differently, in almost any area of the country a wheelie is considered a reckless maneuver and negligent behavior on the part of the rider. Serious personal injury can happen when a rider loses control performing these stunts. Hopefully Gall can make a full recovery and has learned this painful lesson.

This incident also shows the bikes themselves can become deadly projectiles capable of serious damage. Fortunately, the injuries sustained by Jesse and Roth were not described as life threatening.

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September 23, 2010

Motorcyclist seriously injured in wreck with tractor-trailer

Michael Winters, 28, was seriously injured in a Missouri motorcycle accident when he collided with a tractor-trailer on Missouri Highway 5 in Laclede County.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Winters was traveling northbound on a 2006 Suzuki motorcycle when the accident occurred. The tractor-trailer, a 2001 Freightliner driven by Andrew Nockunas, 41, was ahead of the motorcyclist. Winters attempted to pass the big rig, but at that exact moment, Nockunas attempted to make a left turn. Winters was unable to avoid crashing into the side of the tractor-trailer.

Winters was rushed to St. John's Hospital for emergency treatment. Nockunas did not sustain any injuries.

Fortunately, Winters was wearing a helmet at the time of the crash.

No citations were listed on the initial accident report.

This serious tractor-trailer accident is still under investigation with several details still lacking from the initial reports. First, the speed of the two vehicles must be determined. Also, investigators will look at whether Winters was attempting a legal and safe maneuver when he tried to pass the truck, and whether Nockunas was using his turn signal.

August 1, 2010

Missouri motorcyclist injured in wreck

Gary Tawney, 51, was seriously injured in a Missouri motorcycle accident that happened Saturday morning on Mo. 15.

According to local media reports and the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Tawney was heading south on a 2009 Harley-Davidson at the time of the crash. A 2000 Chevrolet, driven by Jeffrey Crain, 29, was heading north at the same moment. According to the initial description of the wreck by the investigating trooper, Crain failed to yield when making a left turn in front of the motorcycle. Tawney was unable to avoid a collision.

Tawney was taken by ambulance to University Hospital for treatment. Crain wasn't listed as injured.

Driver inattention is one of the leading causes of motorcycle injury accidents. Larger cars will merge or turn without noticing smaller motorcyclists. Since bikers are so much more vulnerable, often times the injuries in these incidents are serious or even fatal. Fortunately, Tawney was able to receive treatment and will hopefully make a full recovery.

July 17, 2010

Motorcycle accident seriously injures rider

Evert Branch, 63, was seriously injured in a Missouri motorcycle accident on Highway 54 in Cole County.

Branch was heading westbound on his 1997 Honda Motorcycle when the accident occurred, according to the investigating trooper from the Missouri State Highway Patrol. Also heading westbound just ahead of Branch was Cole County Sheriff's Deputy Justin Rollins, 27. Rollins received a call to respond to a possible domestic violence incident when he turned abruptly in front of Branch's motorcycle. Branch was unable to avoid the collision and hit the side of the patrol car, ejecting him from the bike.

Branch was airlifted to University Hospital in Columbia with serious injuries. Rollins was uninjured.

According to a Jefferson City News Tribune report, Rollins had not turned on his lights or sirens. There is no indication he was speeding, though an investigation into this Mid-Missouri motorcycle crash is still ongoing and a full accident reconstruction has yet to be performed.

Rollins has been placed on administrative leave while a standard internal investigation is being conducted. It could be a couple weeks before all the details of the investigation are released.

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May 13, 2010

Motorcycle wreck hospitalizes Missouri man

Ronald Hall, 20, was injured in a Missouri motorcycle accident on Missouri 76 near Tiff City.

Hall was riding his 1997 Suzuki motorcycle westbound at the time of the wreck, according to a Missouri State Highway Patrol report. He approached an intersection at the same time as Charles Bales, 58, who was driving a 2001 Oldsmobile. Bales pulled out of the intersection into the path of Hall's motorcycle. Hall was unable to avoid a collision and struck the Oldsmobile.

Hall was taken by ambulance to Freeman West Hospital for emergency treatment. He was wearing a helmet. Bales was uninjured and was able to drive from the scene.

Again we have a case of a car not seeing a motorcycle at an intersection and pulling into its path. This scenario, and cars merging into motorcycles on the highway, are the most common causes of serious motorcycle accident injuries.

Now, there are still some details missing from the the initial crash report of this latest accident. We don't know the speed at which Hall was traveling or whether he had the right of way in the intersection. Whatever the liability situation of this particular incident, it serves as yet another warning to drivers and riders to be cautious when out on the road.

April 27, 2010

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

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The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and state transportation departments all around the country are gearing up for Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in May. Purposely set in spring as the weather warms and riding season gets into full swing, the awareness program is designed to spotlight the dangers of motorcycle riding while providing tips on how to make riding safer and more fun.

It would seem that motorcycle safety awareness is needed now more than ever. We've already seen a string of serious motorcycle injury accidents in St. Louis this year and the numbers only look to go up as we get into summer. The national statistics on motorcycle crashes are even more sobering.

To illustrate the dangers of riding, organizers behind Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month have released an analysis of crash statistics. Here are some of the more startling numbers:

- In 2008, the last full year statistics are available, there were 5,290 motorcyclist fatalities in highway crashes.

- The number of motorcycle crash deaths has risen every year since 1997.

- Almost half of these fatalities occurred when a motorcycle crashed into another type of vehicle.

- More than 90% of the fatal two-vehicle crashes involving a motorcycle happened on non-interstate roadways.

- Half of the cases where a motorcycle collided with another vehicle occurred at an intersection, and a large portion of those incidents happened as a result of another vehicle making a left turn in front of a motorcyclist.

More statistics and tips on how to prevent motorcycle accident injuries and fatalities can be found on the NHTSA website.

April 19, 2010

Missouri motorcyclist rear-ended and injured

Shaun McClure, 28, was seriously injured Monday when the motorcycle he was riding was rear-ended on Missouri 52 in Miller County.

This Missouri motorcycle accident occurred just after 6:30 p.m. at the intersection of Missouri 52 and Pace Road. McClure was riding a 2003 Yamaha Star Motorcycle westbound at the time of the crash. Behind McClure was a 2000 Dodge Ram, driven by Steven Shelton, 54. McClure slowed to make a right turn at the intersection, but Shelton was unable to stop his pickup in time and slammed into the back of the motorcyclist.

McClure was rushed to University Hospital in Columbia for emergency treatment. Shelton did not sustain any serious injury.

It is unclear what exactly caused this accident. Shelton could have taken his focus off the road ahead of him or McClure may have made a sudden stop before his turn. Usually, rear-end collision cases find that the rear most vehicle was at fault and, due to the rear impact collision doctrine, that at-fault driver is usually found to be negligent. This is because all drivers should be in control of where their vehicle is heading and allow plenty of space in between them and the vehicle in front of them.

Shelton might also have had trouble judging the speed of the smaller motorcycle ahead of him. Many times, drivers or large cars misjudge the speed and distance of a motorcycles because of their small size. This further underscores why drivers have to be so vigilant on the roads and learn to share them with motorcyclists.

April 15, 2010

Another Missouri motorcycle accident results in serious injury

Continuing a rash of serious Missouri motorcycle accidents, Keith Geisner, 33, was hospitalized after a crash on Route DD in St. Genevieve County.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Geisner was riding a 2000 Harley Davidson motorcycle eastbound on Route DD just before the accident occurred. At the same time, Donald Rogers, 41, was traveling westbound in a 1994 Ford Explorer. The oncoming vehicles approached the intersection with Kinsey Road at nearly the same time. Rogers attempted to make a left turn onto Kinsey Road, but failed to yield to Geisner. Geisner was unable to avoid colliding into Rogers' SUV and was thrown from his bike.

Geisner was airlifted to St. John's Hospital for emergency treatment. Rogers was not seriously injured in this Missouri motorcycle crash.

No citation was noted on the initial crash report filed by the investigating state trooper.

This accident is very similar to others that have happened in the St. Louis area recently. Larger cars have a tendency to misjudge where motorcycles are and can pull in front of them or cut them off, causing a serious accident. From the initial report, that's what appears to have happened in this incident, but further investigation is always important to verify the brief initial details.

If you or a family member have been involved in an accident and would like to educate yourself on your legal rights, contact a St. Louis area motorcycle accident lawyer as soon as possible.

April 13, 2010

Share the road with motorcycles

As the weather begins to warm up, more and more motorcyclists are hitting the road. Unfortunately, this also means we will start to see more motorcycle injury accidents on local highways. Already, there have been dozens of accidents with most of them resulting in serious injury or even death.

The dangers of motorcycle riding are obvious. Without the protection provided by the body of a car, motorcycle riders are particularly vulnerable in crashes. Helmets offer some protection, but if thrown from a bike at high speeds, serious injury is almost inevitable.

In addition to being more vulnerable in a crash, motorcycle riders are also at a disadvantage because their smaller size often leads to other drivers overlooking them on the roadway and causing a crash.

Here are some tips to help us all avoid more serious Missouri motorcycle crashes:

-Drivers need to be on the lookout for motorcycles. They are smaller and harder to spot, but they share the road with larger passenger cars all the time. It is everyone's responsibility to be looking out for one another.

-Since motorcycles are smaller and generally only have one headlight, their speed and distance may be harder to judge. Other drivers need to be aware of this and take this into account on the roadways.

-Give motorcyclists plenty of space when following them and make sure to check your blind spots when changing lanes. This is just safe driving in general, but worth mentioning again here because of the vulnerability of motorcyclists.

-Motorcycle riders need to take responsibility for their own safety. Too many times we see fatal motorcycle accidents caused by a rider speeding negligently down the highway or weaving his way in and out of traffic. Also, no matter what state you are in and what laws exist at the time, please, wear a helmet.

April 11, 2010

Motorcycle wreck seriously injures Washington, Missouri man

David Presley, 35, was seriously injured Sunday in a Missouri motorcycle accident on Route YY in Franklin County.

According to the investigating trooper of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Presley was riding a 2007 Kawasaki Motorcycle eastbound on Route YY at the time of the accident. At the same time, Mary Bowman, 56, was driving a 1999 Ford Ranger pickup truck westbound on the same road. As the two vehicles approached Route C, Bowman attempted to make a left turn. The pickup pulled into the path of the motorcycle and Presley was unable to avoid a collision. Presley's motorcycle slammed into the passenger side of the pickup.

Presley was seriously injured and taken to St. John's Hospital for treatment. Bowman was not injured.

Motorcycle injury accidents can be devastating to those involved. With nothing to protect to the rider, they are often seriously injured or worse. Hopefully Presley can make a full recovery.

Many times, motorcycle crashes are caused because other drivers didn't see the motorcyclist until it was too late. Larger passenger cars will merge vehicles off the roadway or cut in front of the smaller motorcycle which leads to an accident. In this particular case, while the accident was caused when Bowman made a left turn, some more details need to be fleshed out before liability can be determined. The speeds of the two vehicles as well whether either driver broke any driving regulations needs to be determined. None of this information is available on the initial crash report.

Sometimes, insurance companies will not be cooperative in making sure accident victims get the assistance they need for a full recovery. In these cases, victims should contact a St. Louis area motorcycle accident lawyer to make sure their rights are protected. Our lawyers frequently handle car accidents in Franklin County, Missouri and can advise you on your legal rights.

March 29, 2010

Motorcycle accident seriously injures Missouri couple

Two people were hospitalized Monday afternoon after a Missouri motorcycle crash on Highway 112 near Cassville.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the accident occurred as Arthur Brophy, 38, and Melissa Brophy, 30, were riding their 1996 Honda motorcycle northbound on the highway. A 2001 Pontiac Sunfire, driven by Shawanna Hains, 25, was approaching the motorcycle in the southbound lanes. Hains attempted to make a left turn and pulled directly into the path of the motorcycle. Brophy was unable to avoid a collision and crashed into the side of the car.

Both Arthur and Melissa Brophy were taken to St. John's Hospital for treatment. Hains was uninjured in the crash.

Motorcycle accidents are often caused by other drivers not realizing a motorcycle is present and then turning or merging into them. Most drivers only quickly glance to look for other cars and don't notice the smaller motorcycle that might riding next to them or approaching them. Every driver needs to make sure that they share the road with motorcycle riders.

Hopefully the Brophys can make a full recovery from this motorcycle injury accident. Fortunately, they were wearing their helmets at the time of the crash.

While the description of the accident gives some details, we don't know exactly who is at fault for this accident. Why didn't Hains see the oncoming motorcycle in the middle of the day? Was Arthur Brophy driving at an excessive speed? Did Hains make her left turn without signaling? All these questions need to be answered by further investigation.

March 6, 2010

Missouri motorcycle-ATV crash kills one teen and injures another

A tragic Missouri motorcycle accident took the life of a Missouri teenager and left another in serious condition Saturday evening in McDonald County.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Michael Dutton, 17, was riding a Kawasaki motorcycle on Bear Hollow Road at the same time Camron Bridges, 17, was approaching on a Kawasaki four-wheeler. They struck head on, totaling both vehicles.

Both victims were taken to a local hospital. Bridges was pronounced dead shortly after 1 a.m. on Sunday while Dutton remained in serious condition.

Neither victim was wearing a helmet, according to the initial crash report.

No description of what actually caused this serious Missouri motorcycle crash was given in the report. It was late, so visibility was low and could have contributed, but it is not certain which driver was out of his lane to cause the head-on collision.

Dutton was tested for alcohol in accordance with Missouri law after a fatal traffic accident. An investigation into the crash continues.

December 18, 2009

Harley Davidson issues recall due to fuel leak concerns

Harley-Davidson Inc. has issued a recall for more than 100,000 motorcycles manufactured in the last year because the danger of leaking gasoline after a motorcycle crash.

Specifically, the recall affects bikes manufactured from June 6, 2008 to November 19, 2009, including some touring models.

The problem occurs in front-end motorcycle accidents when stress is placed on the fuel tank. There is a chance that the fuel tank could rupture in this scenario, which could leak gas and ignite causing serious personal injury to the rider.

According to Harley-Davidson Inc., they are not aware of any incidents related to this problem, but issued the the recall voluntarily once the problem was discovered. As part of the recall, customers can have their bikes modified with braces on the gas tank to prevent the leaks.

Contact Harley-Davidson for more information.

September 27, 2009

Missouri motorcyclist killed in Highway 52 crash

James Bauer, 63, was killed Sunday evening when his 2006 Harley Davidson motorcycle was hit by another car.

Bauer was traveling eastbound on Missouri 52 about two miles from Route T when the accident occurred. According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, a 1998 Chevrolet, driven by Eric Wilbanks, 18, hit Bauer’s motorcycle from behind. No specific details regarding how fast the vehicles were going or what could have caused Wilbanks to hit the motorcycle were available.

Bauer was taken to University Hospital in Columbia where he was pronounced dead.

Since this Missouri motorcycle accident resulted in a fatality, there will be an accident reconstruction to determine exactly what happened.

Bauer was wearing a helmet at the time of the crash.

While rear-end collisions usually indicate negligence on the part of the at-fault driver, we will have to wait to see if further investigation backs up the accident description in the initial crash report. If Wilbanks is found to be liable for the accident, Bauer’s family may be able to contact a Missouri motorcycle accident lawyer to file a wrongful death claim and recover damages to help pay for funeral expenses and other bills resulting from the crash.

July 2, 2009

Nixon vetoes bill that repeals helmet law

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Missouri Governor Jay Nixon vetoed a bill today that would have allowed many Missouri motorcycle enthusiasts to ride without a helmet.

The bill had passed both the Missouri House and Senate and had been waiting on Nixon’s approval for several weeks. We commented on the bill in a post last month about motorcycle safety laws.

The bill would have repealed many of Missouri’s existing helmet laws and allowed anybody over 21 to ride a motorcycle without a helmet if they so choose. Under Missouri law, all motorcyclists must wear a helmet at all times to protect themselves from motorcycle injury accidents.

Nixon said he made the decision that was the most safe and cost-effective one for Missouri. He believes that more motorcyclists would die in accidents and treating the additional injuries would cause health care costs in the state to rise.

A similar bill was vetoed by former Missouri Governor Mel Carnahan in 1999.

Several studies from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have shown that personal injuries and fatalities related to motorcycle accidents increased in states that have limited or repealed helmet laws.

Overall, motorcycle crashes are on the rise across the country. Over three thousand people die each year due to injuries sustained in motorcycle accidents. Sometimes these are wrongful death cases where another driver doesn’t see the smaller motorcyclists and pulls his vehicle into the path of the bike causing the tragic incident.

Supporters of the bill to repeal the helmet laws say they will continue to push for their cause.

July 1, 2009

Lincoln County, Missouri motorcycle crash sends teen to hospital

Mathew Stone, 16, was seriously injured Wednesday when his 2006 Kawasaki Ninja crashed into a car on Route KK in Lincoln County, Missouri.

According to the investigating officer from the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the car was a 2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse, driven by Virginia Anderson, 53. Anderson had been stopped at a stop sign at the intersection of Walker Road and Route KK. As Stone traveled southbound on the motorcycle, Anderson attempted to make a left turn onto Route KK and pulled into the path of the motorcyclist.

Stone suffered serious personal injury and was flown to St. Joseph West Hospital in St. Charles for treatment. Anderson was uninjured in this Missouri motorcycle accident, according to the crash report.

It is not known how fast Stone was driving his motorcycle. An accident reconstruction will be able to determine how fast Stone was driving and how much time he had to react to Anderson pulling out in front of him.

If Anderson is found to be negligent in pulling her car onto Route KK, Stone may be able to recover damages to cover medical expenses. Even if Stone was speeding himself, a St. Louis area personal injury lawyer may be able to get some damages awarded based on the comparative fault system. These laws allow for multiple parties to be at fault for an accident with damages being paid based on their level of negligence and proportion of responsibility for the accident.

June 22, 2009

Three motorcycles crash into tractor

Three people suffered serious personal injury when three motorcycles crashed into a John Deere Tractor on Missouri 139 Saturday afternoon.

The accident occurred in Carroll County, Missouri as the tractor, driven by Donald Cooper, 55, entered the roadway ahead of a group of motorcycles. According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, the first motorcycle, a 1998 Harley Davidson driven by Robert Ely, 33, crashed into the rear of the tractor. Wade Beers, the driver of the second motorcycle, attempted to avoid a collision by laying down his motorcycle and sliding off the roadway. The third motorcycle and its driver, George Pease, 52, then hit the tractor as well.

Ely and a passenger on his bike, Laura Lisby, 30, were seriously injured and taken to University Hospital in Columbia, Missouri for treatment. Pease also suffered serious personal injury, but was taken instead to Carroll County Memorial Hospital.

All riders in this motorcycle accident were wearing a helmet.

No summons information was provided by the investigating officer.

The question for a Missouri personal injury lawyer is whether or not the tractor driver negligently pulled his tractor in front of the group of motorcyclists. By performing an accident reconstruction, authorities will be able to determine the speeds of the motorcycles and just how long the drivers had to react to the tractor being in the roadway in front of them.

If the driver of the tractor was issued a summons, that would also be an indication that he was likely at fault for this Missouri motorcycle crash.

June 3, 2009

Missouri helmet law revision still waiting on Nixon’s approval

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Missouri Senate Bill 202, a bill that would allow motorcyclists to ride without a helmet, is still awaiting a signature from Governor Jay Nixon.

The bill passed through both the House and Senate last month and will become law if Nixon doesn’t veto it.

The bill will change two motorcycle related laws in Missouri if passed. The first, and most publicized change, is that anybody over 21 will have the option to wear a helmet when riding their motorcycle. Currently, all riders must wear a helmet at all times to protect against motorcycle injury accidents.

The other major element of Senate Bill 202 that’s not getting as much attention from the media, though it’s certainly getting the attention of Missouri personal injury attorneys, is the effect the bill will have on insurance law.

Under current law, if a motorcycle was involved in an injury accident with a car, an insurance company could deny the cyclist a large portion of their insurance claim on the grounds that a motorcycle is a hazardous vehicle. Insurance companies could do this even if the motorcyclist was fault-free in the accident.

Legislators found this discrepancy unfair to motorcyclists so the bill would close this loophole and force insurance companies to treat cyclists the same as car drivers.

If signed by the governor, the law would take effect this year and expire in August 2014 giving the Missourians time to see the ramifications with regard to public safety and insurance law before renew or rewriting the law.

May 30, 2009

Missouri motorcycle accident in St. Louis County injures couple

Steven and Tina Johnson, 40 and 39, were hospitalized Saturday after the Harley Davidson motorcycle they were riding on crashed into a 1995 Buick LeSabre that was pulling out of a private drive in St. Louis County.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol’s investigating officer, Daniel Witte, 63, was pulling the Buick out of a private driveway onto Highway F near Lake Tickawatha. The Johnsons were riding their motorcycle southbound on Highway F and Steven Johnson tried to stop before hitting the car. He applied the brakes, but was unable to stop the bike from sliding into the car.

Tina Johnson was flown to St. John’s Mercy Hospital with serious injures. Steven Johnson was also taken to St. John’s, but he was transported by ambulance with more moderate injuries. Witte was uninjured.

The task now for authorities and for a personal injury attorney will be to investigate the scene and determine who is at fault for this accident. The initial crash report lays out the basic information, but leaves out some vital details like how fast the Johnson’s were going on their motorcycle.

If Witte was inattentive and pulled his car out directly in front of the Johnsons, he may be liable for damages and the Johnsons may be able to recover their medical fees. An investigation into this injury accident may also show that Steven Johnson was driving the bike too fast and was the one more at fault for the wreck.

One way that investigators and a motorcycle accident lawyer can get this information is by performing an accident reconstruction. By looking at the skid marks on the road and the debris patterns, experts can pretty accurately determine the speeds of both vehicles and how much time Steven Johnson had to react to Witte’s car coming into the roadway.

May 3, 2009

Missouri helmet laws may be changing

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The Missouri House and Senate have both passed a bill that would allow motorcycle riders to ride without a helmet except on highways. The law will go into effect if Gov. Jay Nixon doesn’t veto it.

Under the current law, all riders must have a helmet at all times to protect themselves from motorcycle injury accidents.

If the new law is put in place, anybody over 21 will have the option to wear a helmet when they ride their motorcycle. According to the St. Louis Post Dispatch, 30 other states have similar partial helmet laws or no helmet laws.

Supporters of the change say riders should have the freedom to choose without the government becoming a nanny-state and legislating personal safety.

Opponents say that the costs associated with fatal and serious injuries sustained in Missouri motorcycle accidents are passed along to non-riders by increased insurance premiums and taxes.

In 2007, over 2,300 accidents involving motorcycles occurred in Missouri. 93 people were killed in these accidents and over 2,000 were injured. According to the Post Dispatch, Arkansas and Texas both saw sharp declines in helmet use after they loosened helmet laws in recent years. Fatalities in both states increased by 25 percent in the year after the laws were passed.

April 3, 2009

Missouri motorcycle crash injures couple

Randy and Brenda Youngblood, 50 and 41 respectively, were hospitalized Friday morning after a Missouri motorcycle injury crash in Shannon County.

While the full details of the crash are not known, an initial crash report was filed by the Missouri State Highway Patrol. According to the investigating officer, the Youngbloods were riding a 2004 Suzuki Motorcycle northbound on Highway 60 near Montier, Missouri. A 2003 Ford F-150, driven by Donna Smith, 36, was traveling eastbound on Route U and attempted to pull onto Highway 60. Smith’s pickup pulled out in front of the Youngblood’s bike and Randy Youngblood was unable to avoid crashing into the passenger side of the truck.

Both Randy and Brenda Youngblood were taken by ambulance to St. Francis Hospital for treatment. Fortunately, they were both wearing helmets or their injuries could have been much more serious or even fatal.

The initial crash report seems to indicate that Smith pulled out in front of the motorcycle because she didn’t see it coming. This is a common problem on the roadways of Missouri that has lead to numerous other personal injury lawsuits. Many drivers, particularly in large pickups or SUV’s, cause accidents because they don’t see the much smaller motorcyclists and negligently pull in front of them.

More investigation by authorities and a Missouri motorcycle accident attorney will be needed before liability is known in this Shannon County crash.

January 9, 2009

Moped accident in Franklin County, Missouri kills one

Dustin Reed, 21, was killed Friday while riding a moped on Missouri 47 in Franklin County, Missouri.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Reed was traveling southbound in front of a 1996 Chevrolet Blazer, driven by Scott Pelton, 17. Reed and his moped began to drift across the center line just before making a right turn at Mooreland Drive. As Reed was making the turn, his moped was struck on the right side by Pelton’s Blazer. Reed was thrown from his moped and the Blazer ran off the roadway, struck a street sign, and came to rest in a ditch.

Reed was pronounced dead at the scene. Pelton suffered no major injuries, according to the investigating officer.

The dangers of moped and motorcycle riding are well known. Each year, nearly 5,000 people die in motorcycle or moped accidents. A person is 35 times more likely to die in a crash on a motorcycle as opposed to riding in a passenger car. Crashes are often caused because other drivers simply don’t see the motorcyclist on the roadway.

Mopeds and motorcycles might have their unique risks, but that does not mean riders lose their right to recover damages in an accident. Many times insurance companies will try to say a rider was at least partially at fault for an accident. The personal injury attorney representing the rider will then have to examine all the details including tire skid marks, vehicle speed and road conditions to expose negligence on the part of the other drivers.

If you or a loved one are injured in a motorcycle or moped accident, you must act quickly. Keep good documentation of the events of the crash and call an experienced St. Louis moped or motorcycle accident lawyer as soon as possible.

August 30, 2008

Motorcyclist killed in accident north of Kansas City

Christopher Fry, 26, was killed Friday when his motorcycle collided with a 2000 Toyota on Missouri 33 at 114th Street.

According to the investigating officer, this Kansas City wrongful death claim occurred when Fry was traveling south on Missouri 33 when the Toyota, driven by Richard Goodman, 31, emerged from a private drive and crossed into Fry’s path. Fry was thrown from his motorcycle by the crash.

Fry was taken to Liberty Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Goodman suffered no injuries, according to the Highway Patrol.

An investigation into the accident continues. It is not known how fast Fry was traveling and whether Goodman negligently pulled out of the private drive into the motorcycle’s path. An accident reconstruction will look at tire skid marks and debris placement to get a better idea of the events leading to this crash and determine liability.

August 19, 2008

Missouri man gets DWI for pushing motorcycle

A recent Missouri court ruling found that a Missouri man, Andrew Hack, was driving his motorcycle while intoxicated despite the fact he was only pushing the motorcycle.

The incident occurred when Hack, who had met some friends at a bar, decided to move his motorcycle from in front of the bar so a coworker could take it home. Ironically, Hack said he was giving it to his coworker because he didn’t want to have his license revoked for drinking and driving.

Hack began pushing the motorcycle, which was running, around the bar when it suddenly jumped forward and crashed through a fence. An officer that was sent to investigate arrested Hack and gave him a blood-alcohol content test which showed Hack had drank over the limit.

Initially, a trial court ruling said that Hack was not driving the motorcycle and should retain his license. The State of Missouri appealed and the Missouri Court of Appeals reversed the decision, saying that having the key in the ignition, the engine running, and using the motor to assist in movement constitutes operating the motorcycle.

While it is unfortunate that Hack appeared to be trying to do the right thing, nobody should ever put the keys in the ignition after they have been drinking. DWI convictions are taken very seriously by Missouri law enforcement and for good reason. Missouri is above the national average in alcohol related crashes with several thousand each year. These accidents caused over 2,000 injuries and 155 deaths in 2006, the last year such statistics were compiled. Hack is perhaps fortunate that only a fence was damaged by his motorcycle and nobody was hurt.

If you or someone you know has been involved in an accident with a drunk driver, you should contact a personal injury attorney as soon as possible. Personal injury cases are time sensitive and vital evidence can be lost if not collected quickly.

E. Ryan Bradley has handled personal injury cases for over 30 years. If you have any questions about your legal rights, contact one of our attorneys for a free consultation.

August 18, 2008

Missouri motorcyclist killed in accident with Hummer

Chad Fuqua, 40, was killed early Monday morning when his motorcycle collided with a 2007 Hummer on Business Loop 65 in Hollister, Missouri.

According to the highway patrol report, the Hummer, driven by Chadwick Carter, 27, made a U-turn into Fuqua’s path. Fuqua struck the left rear of the Hummer and was thrown from his motorcycle.

Fuqua was taken to Skaggs Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 1:15 a.m.

Accidents involving fatalities are subject to an accident reconstruction. The police report has a brief description of the crash, but this is considered hearsay unless the investigating officer witnessed the crash or is trained in accident reconstruction. This additional investigation will analyze tire skid marks and debris patterns to determine whether the drivers involved were operating their vehicles in a negligent manner.

If Carter is found to have been negligent in making the U-turn, Fuqua's family may be able to collect damages to cover funeral costs and other expenses. Whenever somebody is injured or killed in a Missouri accident, the liability insurance of the at-fault driver is required to pay for any expenses that resulted from the crash.

It is possible that Carter did not see the much smaller motorcycle as he made his turn. Most Missouri motorcycle accidents occur when other drivers are unaware of the motorcycle and turn into them. If you or someone you know is injured in a motorcycle crash, you should call an experienced motorcycle personal injury attorney as soon as possible.

E. Ryan Bradley has handled motorcycle cases for over 30 years. Contact us for a free consultation where we will discuss your legal rights. You will never receive a bill from us and we are only compensated if we are successful on your case.

August 7, 2008

Missouri Motorcycle Accident Injures Neosho Woman

Patty Coe, 37, was seriously injured Wednesday when the Harley Davidson motorcycle she was riding was rear-ended on Gateway Drive just north of Neosho, Missouri.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Coe and the motorcycle’s driver, Steven Woodworth, 43, were attempting to make a left turn when they were hit from behind by a van. The driver of the van was Monna Rice, 63, also of Neosho.

Coe suffered serious injuries and was taken to Freeman West Hospital in Joplin. Woodworth was treated for minor injuries at the same hospital. Rice was uninjured, according to the investigating officer.

This incident is very similar to another Missouri motorcycle crash from Sunday in which a pickup rear-ended a motorcyclist that had just made a left turn. As with that incident, which we reported on here, the “rear-end collision doctrine” would likely apply. This doctrine simply states that negligence is presumed on the part of the at-fault driver in rear-end collisions. In both cases, however, a personal injury attorney should be contacted immediately as evidence can be lost if action is delayed.

This Missouri crash is also a reminder to motorists to be more attentive on the roadways. Most Missouri and Illinois motorcycle crashes occur when other drivers fail to notice the motorcyclist and turn or merge into them.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a similar crash, contact E. Ryan Bradley for a free consultation. We have over 30 years of experience and our personal injury attorneys will offer you advice with no obligation to hire our firm. You will also never receive a legal fee from us as we are only compensated if we are successful on your case.

August 5, 2008

Missouri Teen Killed in Motorcycle Accident

Corey Stuck, 17, was killed Sunday in a motorcycle crash near Lee’s Summit.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Stuck was riding a 2002 Honda motorcycle on Highway 50 when he hit a 2001 Toyota Camry, driven by Lolita McRoy, 70, that failed to yield while crossing the highway.

Stuck was pronounced dead at the scene. McRoy was treated for minor injuries.

Since there was a fatality in this accident, an accident reconstruction will be conducted to determine the exact circumstances that lead to this Missouri crash. While the Missouri State Highway Patrol has a brief summary of the crash, this is just the opinion of investigating officer. Under Missouri evidence law, these opinions are considered hearsay unless the officer witnessed the crash or is trained in accident reconstruction. Most highway patrol officers do not have this expertise, so trained accident reconstructionists will often need to be consulted in incidents like the Lee’s Summit crash.

If the other driver is found to be at fault, Stuck’s family may be able to collect damages to help pay for the funeral and other expenses. Whenever someone is injured by another person’s negligence, the liability insurance of the party at fault is required to pay for medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and any disability that results from the accident. Since these matters are very time sensitive, it is important to contact an experienced Missouri personal injury attorney as soon as possible.

E. Ryan Bradley has over 30 years of experience handling wrongful death and injury accident cases. Contact us for a free consultation if you or a loved one has been involved in an accident in Missouri or Illinois.

August 3, 2008

Missouri Motorcyclist Seriously Injured by Pickup Truck

Charles Wells, 68, was seriously injured when his motorcycle was rear-ended on Route M near Lawson, Missouri.

According to the investigating officer, Wells had made a left turn onto Route M from 160th Street when he was struck from behind by a Chevrolet pickup, driven by Clinton Whitney, 21. Wells was thrown from his 2004 Kawasaki motorcycle by the impact.

Wells was taken to Liberty Hospital with serious injuries. Whitney was uninjured, according to the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

An investigation into the cause of this accident will need to be performed by a personal injury attorney in conjunction with the local highway patrol. At this time, it is not known whether Whitney did not see the motorcycle or was traveling too fast to stop.

Under most circumstances, Missouri law says that the at-fault driver’s negligence is presumed in rear impact accidents. This doctrine, commonly referred to as the “rear end collision doctrine,” is based on the reasoning that all drivers are required to be in control of their vehicles at all times. A personal injury lawyer would need only to convince a judge the doctrine applies to prove negligence.

E. Ryan Bradley has handled personal injury cases from Missouri and Illinois motorcycle accidents for over 30 years. If you or a family member have been involved in a similar accident, contact one of our experienced attorneys for a free, no obligation consultation.

July 29, 2008

Missouri Motorcyclist Killed in Head-On Collision

Motorcyclist Michael Norman, 48, was killed Monday evening when he was hit head-on by a Jeep near Marshfield, Mo.

According to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Norman was riding his 2004 Honda Motorcycle north on Route CC when a 1990 Jeep Cherokee, driven by Ethan Dinwiddie, 30, crossed the center line and struck him head-on. Authorities have not indicated what caused Dinwiddie’s vehicle to cross into oncoming traffic.

Norman was pronounced dead on the scene. Dinwiddie was taken to Cox South Hospital in Springfield with moderate injuries.

Because the accident resulted in a fatality, the highway patrol will conduct an accident reconstruction to determine exactly how this incident occurred.

This accident illustrates how vulnerable Missouri motorcyclists are to serious injury while on the roadways. Missouri motorcycle accidents often occur because other motorists don’t see the person on the motorcycle and a simple negligent act can lead to serious injury and death. Many drivers don’t look out for bike riders and will change lanes or turn into the motorcyclist.

E. Ryan Bradley has handled Missouri and Illinois motorcycle accidents for over 30 years. If you or a loved one has been involved in an accident, contact one of our attorneys to discuss your legal rights. We will provide a free consultation with no obligation to hire our firm, as well a promise that you will never receive a legal bill. We only receive compensation if we are successful with your case.

July 21, 2008

Missouri Motorcycle Accident Injures Man Near Warrensburg

Daniel Coleman, 57, was seriously injured Sunday afternoon when his 2004 Harley Davidson motorcycle collided with another vehicle on Route Y.

According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, a Ford F150, driven by Daniel Cameron, 37, made a left turn into the path of Coleman’s motorcycle. Coleman crashed into the rear of the truck and was thrown from his motorcycle, which slid off the road. Cameron initially left the scene of the accident, but later returned.

Coleman was airlifted to Research Medical Center in Kansas City.

A summons was issued to Cameron for driving with a revoked license, failing to yield, and driving without insurance.

Even though Coleman was injured in an accident with an uninsured driver, he may be able to recover damages from his own insurance plan. Under Missouri law, all insurance plans, including liability only plans, come with uninsured motorist coverage that must provide at least $25,000 of coverage per person. This coverage allows drivers to file a claim against their own insurance company to pay compensation for bodily injury or death resulting from an accident caused by an uninsured or hit-and-run driver. Often insurance plans will not state that uninsured motorist coverage (UM) is included, hoping a claim will never be made. This is a sneaky tactic used by insurance companies more concerned with their bottom line than the health and financial stability of their clients. UM coverage is typically written for the same amount of liability coverage carried by the insured.

There is a Statute of Limitations that applies when filing uninsured motorist claims so it is important for anybody involved in such a crash to contact a personal injury attorney as soon as possible.

E. Ryan Bradley has over 30 years of experience in handling insurance claims. If you have questions regarding your insurance coverage, Contact Us today for free consultation.

July 18, 2008

Missouri Motorcycle Accident Causes Serious Injury

Glen Hartless, 25, was seriously injured Thursday after a crashing his motorcycle into another vehicle in Park Hills, Missouri.

According to the highway patrol, Hartless was traveling westbound on Highway 32 when a 2003 Chrysler Sebring, driven by Helen Wakefield, 80, turned into his path. Hartless struck the vehicle and was thrown from his motorcycle.

Hartless was taken to Mineral Area Hospital. Wakefield was treated for minor injuries at Parkland Hospital.

Most Missouri motorcycle accidents occur when drivers in other vehicles fail to notice the person on the motorcycle. Often the driver will turn into the path of the motorcycle or merge into it when changing lanes.

If you or a loved one has been involved in a Missouri or Illinois motorcycle accident, one of the most important things to do is contact an experienced personal injury attorney as soon as possible. Cases like these are time sensitive and any delay could prevent you from recovering the cost of any medical expenses.

E. Ryan Bradley has over thirty years experience handling personal injury and motorcycle accident claims. If you have any questions or need legal advice, contact us for a free consultation.

July 15, 2008

Two Missouri Motorcycle Accidents Cause Serious Injuries

Two Missouri motorcycle accidents in the past two days have sent four riders to the hospital, two of them with serious injuries.

On Monday, Matthew McMullin, 40, was riding his 2004 Suzuki on Missouri 79 north of Elsberry when he hit a 2003 Ford Sport Trac, driven by Edwin Fattmann, 49. According to the highway patrol, Fattmann was attempting to make a left turn and cut in front of the motorcycle causing McMullin to hit the side of the Sport Trac.

McMullin suffered serious injuries and was taken by helicopter to St. John’s Hospital in Creve Coeur. Kimberly McMullin, 40, was also riding on the motorcycle and was taken by ambulance to St. John’s with only moderate injuries.

Today, on the other side of Missouri, a very similar accident occurred when James Mealman, 38, and Keith Mealman, 20, crashed their motorcycles on Missouri 291 south of Lee’s Summit.

James and Keith were riding on separate motorcycles and were attempting to pass a line of cars when they hit the side of a 1989 Ford F250 pickup, driven by Wilbur Strange, 53. According to the highway patrol, Strange was attempting to make a left turn and crossed into the path of the two motorcycles.

James Mealman suffered serious injuries and was taken to Research Main Medical Facility in Kansas City. Keith Mealman suffered only minor injuries, but was also taken to Research Main for treatment.

All four riders involved in the two incidents were wearing helmets.

These two incidents show the importance of both wearing the proper safety devices and being attentive on the roadways. Missouri motorcycle accidents often occur because other motorists don’t see the person on the motorcycle. Many drivers don’t look out for bike riders and will change lanes or turn into the motorcyclist. A simple negligent act can lead to serious injury and death as motorcyclists are so vulnerable on the roadways.

E. Ryan Bradley has thirty years of experience in handling personal injury claims and wrongful death claims arising from Missouri motorcycle accidents. If you have any questions about your legal rights in these cases, contact us today and one of our experienced attorneys will provide you with a free consultation. In addition, you will never be sent a legal bill from us. We only take a fee if we are successful on your case.

You may also visit our website’s section on Missouri motorcycle accidents for more information.


July 7, 2008

Two Injured When Motorcycle Is Hit By Tire

John Hirner, 33, and James Tennimon, 14, were injured Sunday in an unusual incident as they rode a motorcycle north on Missouri 79 near Hannibal.

According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, a 1996 Chevrolet, driven by Ryan Tatman, 16, was traveling south on Missouri 79 when it lost its left rear tire. The tire crossed the center line and struck the motorcycle ridden by Hirner and Tennimon causing it to flip and land in the roadway. Tatman pulled his vehicle to the side of the road.

Both Hirner and Tennimon were taken to Hannibal Regional Hospital were they were treated for moderate injuries.

Both riders were wearing helmets.

If Hirner and Tennimon were to seek damages for their medical expenses, an investigation into the Chevrolet’s tire maintenance would need to take place. Forensic engineers would be consulted to determine whether the tire separated as a result of improper maintenance or road conditions. A personal injury attorney would need to determine who last serviced the tire and if they neglected to properly tighten the lugs and secure the tire.

If improper maintenance does turn out to have caused this accident, the last person to service the tires could be held negligent and responsible for paying the damages. In addition, a claim could be asserted against Mr. Tatman because all drivers are required to keep their vehicles in roadworthy condition. If it is discovered that Mr. Tatman knew or should have known the tire was loose or susceptible to falling off, he could be found guilty of negligence.

E. Ryan Bradley has handled Missouri personal injury cases for over 30 years. If you have been injured as a result of improper vehicle maintenance or some other mechanical failure, contact us today for a free consultation.

July 2, 2008

Missouri Man Thrown From Motorcycle In Rear End Collision

Kelly Glover, 53, was thrown from his 2004 Yamaha motorcycle when he was rear ended Tuesday night in Callaway County.

According to the highway patrol, the Missouri motorcycle accident occurred when Glover stopped on Route F to allow the vehicle ahead of him to make a left turn. Glover was then rear ended by a 1993 Chevrolet, driven by Laura Williams, 45, and thrown from his motorcycle.

Glover was taken by ambulance to University Hospital in Columbia where he was listed in moderate condition. Williams was not injured.

Fortunately, Glover was wearing a helmet. In motorcycle crashes, riders have almost no protection to prevent injury and, as a result, are more at risk on Missouri roadways. Statistics indicate motorcycle riders are four times more likely to sustain injury and twenty-one times as likely to die compared to those in other vehicles.

Missouri motorcycle accidents often occur because other motorists don’t see the person on the motorcycle. Many drivers don’t look out for bike riders and will change lanes or turn into the motorcyclist.

This Callaway County crash was also a rear end collision. From a Missouri personal injury lawyer’s perspective, this means the “rear end doctrine” would likely apply. This rule of evidence says when one vehicle hits another motorist from behind, negligence is presumed against the person who rear ended the car in front without having to identify how the crash happened. Many other factors can apply to rear end collisions, however, so it is important that a personal injury lawyer with extensive experience is contacted to prove this doctrine should apply.

E. Ryan Bradley has over thirty years of experience handling personal injury and wrongful death claims arising from Missouri motorcycle accidents. Contact E. Ryan Bradley today and speak to an experienced motorcycle personal injury lawyer about your case for free.

March 21, 2008

Missouri Personal Injury Lawyer: Car Hits Motorcycle, Serious Injury Reported

Our Missouri personal injury lawyer blog routinely reports on statewide car, truck and motorcycle accidents in an effort to bring awareness to how accidents happen and the factors that contribute in causing them. In addition, our Missouri lawyers provide commentary from a legal perspective in an effort to help people become aware of the legal issues involved in these types of cases. Knowledge is power. All too often good people are taken advantage of by large insurance companies. Hopefully by reading our posts, you have learned something about Missouri car accident law, what claims can be made and the underlying insurance issues.

With these principals in mind, we now report a new incident involving a motorcycle and a car. On March 20, 2008, the Missouri State Highway Patrol reported a very serious accident occurred between a vehicle and a motorcycle in Green County, Missouri.

William Schroeder, 77 of Springfield, Missouri was driving a 2000 Honda Accord when he crossed the centerline and struck a 2008 Harley Davidson Motorcycle driven by Michael Davis, 40 of Springfield, Missouri. Mr. Davis was taken to Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Missouri where he was treated for serious injuries. Schroeder was reported to have no injuries.

At this time, it is unknown what caused Mr. Schroeder to cross the centerline. When these details are released, we will update this blog.

In this case, we are unable to determine what insurance coverage either party had. For more information regarding liability, under-insured motorist and uninsured motorist insurance coverage, please visit our St. Louis law firm web site for more information.

March 17, 2008

Missouri Motorcycle Accident Lawyer : Off-Road Accident Kills Motorcyclist

Stephen Buckman, 19 of Desloge, Missouri was killed in a serious motorcycle accident while on an off-road trail in the St. Joe State Park in St. Francois County, Missouri on Sunday at approximately 3:55 p.m. The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported Buckman was struck head-on by an all-terrain vehicle driven by Dalton Smith, 12 of Cedar Hill. Buckman was thrown from the motorcycle and pronounced dead at the scene. Dalton was not injured.

As of late Sunday, no charges have been filed and this Missouri motorcycle crash remains under investigation. The exact cause of Mr. Buckman's death has not been released and it is unknown whether Mr. Buckman was wearing a helmet.

In Missouri wrongful death matters such as this, authorities typically gather witness statements and prepare a written report. If the crash happens on a Missouri roadway, the Missouri Highway Patrol Accident Reconstruction team is called in to perform an accident reconstruction. Since this most unfortunate incident occurred off-road, it is unlikely authorities will conduct additional investigation to determine if other factors contributed to cause this motorcycle accident. As such, it will be up to the family and their lawyer to conduct additional investigation if other contributing factors are discovered. Many times, motorcycle accidents can occur because of structural, mechanical or electrical failure of the motorcycle.

At E. Ryan Bradley, we have decades of experience in conducting thorough and complete investigations of catastrophic accidents, including motorcycle accidents. Contact us today if you have any questions regarding motorcycle, car or truck accidents.

January 15, 2008

Missouri Motorcycle Accident Lawyer: St. Louis Motorcycle Accident Kills Man

A St. Louis motorcycle accident resulted in the death of an unidentified man today. According to the police, a rider was operating his bike on the 900 block of Lemay Ferry Road. St. Louis county police indicated the rider lost control of his motorcycle. However, police declined to comment if any other vehicle was involved in causing this motorcycle accident. Police have not yet released the identity of the rider. No other injuries were reported.

October 30, 2007

Serious Car Accident on Route 0 in Newton County, Missouri Injures Motorcyclist

Jeremy Carney of Stella, Missouri was riding his motorcycle on Route 0 in Newton County, Missouri on October 4, 2007 when Ferrales Ruiz made a left turn in front of Mr. Carney causing his motorcycle to hit the front right of Mr. Ruiz's car.

Mr. Carney was Life Flighted to Freeman West Hospital in Joplin, Missouri where he sustained serious personal injuries. Mr. Fruiz was not injured in this car accident.

E. Ryan Bradley has over thirty years of experience handling personal injury and wrongful death claims arising from Missouri motorcycle accidents. Contact the Bradley Law Firm today and speak to an experienced motorcycle personal injury lawyer about your case for free.

October 8, 2007

Missouri Motorcycle Crash Results in a Wrongful Death in Barton County

George Higgins, 62, was tragically killed Sunday morning in a Missouri motorcycle crash, when a vehicle driven by Michael Barnum crossed into his lane on 1st street in Barton County, Missouri. He was taken to St. John’s Hospital in Joplin, Missouri where he later passed due to serious personal injuries. We expect a Missouri wrongful death lawyer to file suit on behalf of Mr. Higgins within the next few months.

Every lawyer in a Missouri wrongful death lawsuit must get court approval for any settlement that is reached between the decedent's survivor and the tortfeasor. The Missouri wrongful death statute 537.080 provides who may sue on behalf of the wrongfully killed person.

The St. Louis injury lawyers at E. Ryan Bradley have handled numerous wrongful death cases. If you or a loved on have been seriously injured or killed in a car wreck, please call us today at 888-STL-INJURY to discuss your case for free.

September 18, 2007

St. Charles, Missouri Motorcycle Accident Injures O'Fallon, Missouri Man

An O'Fallon, Missouri man sustained moderate personal injury operating his 2006 Harley Davidson motorcycle in St. Charles, Missouri. As 56 year old Billy Gillam was attempting to merge onto Highway 79 from eastbound Interstate 70, he lost control of his motorcycle, which caused it to travel off the roadway. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, the motorcycle struck a sign and overturned, ejecting Mr. Gillam.

Mr. Gillam was taken to St. Joseph Hospital by St. Charles, Missouri ambulance where he was treated for serious injuries. It is undetermined at this time if some object in the roadway caused Mr. Gillam to lose control of his motorcycle. If there was a foreign object in the roadway, Mr. Gillam may be entitled to Uninsured Motorist benefits under his Missouri insurance policy.

September 6, 2007

St. Louis, Missouri Motorcycle Crash Injures Arnold, Missouri Man

A St. Louis, Missouri motorcycle crash seriously injured Arnold, Missouri native Joby Coleman on August 28, 2007. According to the Missouri Highway Patrol, Mr. Coleman was riding his motorcycle when it crashed into the rear of David Stewart's 1989 Toyota Corolla. According to the investigator, the Toyota swerved to avoid hitting another stopped vehicle when the motorcycle crashed into the rear of it.

Mr. Coleman was flown by helicopter to St. Louis University Hospital and was treated for serious personal injury. No court documents have been filed for personal injury to date. As soon as Mr. Coleman seeks a motorcycle injury lawyer and documents are filed with the St. Louis County Court, we will report on what allegations of negligence are alleged.